Ireland

Number of reported cases At least 5 How do we calculate the number of cases

Overview

Ireland does not have an HIV-specific law, but a number of general criminal laws have been used to respond to cases involving HIV transmission risk.

In 2017, a defendant admitted to assault at his home, after he spat into a policeman’s mouth while he had blood in his mouth, shouting “I have AIDS”. The incident occurred after he had been stabbed in the leg following a domestic incident. The accused also admitted to violent disorder after doing the same at a police station. It is understood he was convicted under section 2 of the Non Fatal Offences Against the Person Act of 1997 and section 15 of the Criminal Justice (Public Order) Act, 1994, despite blood tests showing he did not have HIV. Earlier media reports refer to other criminal law interventions relating to spitting and biting: one in 2014, and 2016.

In 2018, the first known Irish case involving alleged sexual transmission of HIV resulted in the conviction of an African national for causing serious harm after allegedly transmitting HIV to two former partners some time during 2009 or 2010. It was alleged that despite being aware of his HIV-positive status, the man neither used condoms nor took anti-viral medication. Both women had children as a result of the relationship but while they were HIV-positive, the children were not. It is understood the accused was charged under section 4 of the Non Fatal Offences Against the Person Act of 1997. The accused was sentenced to 10 years in prison.

In a tragic case, in 2009, the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions accepted a defence that exposure to spit from an HIV-positive person constituted provocation, with a subsequent downgrading of charges. The case related to the killing of a 50 year old man who the assailant presumed was HIV-positive. The act occurred after an argument escalated and the deceased spat at the accused before crossing the road and moving away. The man died after he was pursued, and the assailant punched him to the ground and stomped on his head using his full body weight. HIV cannot be transmitted by spit.

Laws

Non Fatal Offences Against the Person Act

General criminal law (active)
Year enacted
1997
Relevant text of the law

Section 2

 

2.—(1) A person shall be guilty of the offence of assault who, without lawful excuse,

intentionally or recklessly—

(a) directly or indirectly applies force to or causes an impact on the body of another, or

(b) causes another to believe on reasonable grounds that he or she is likely immediately to be subjected to any such force or impact, without the consent of the other.

(2) In subsection (1) (a), “force” includes—

(a) application of heat, light, electric current, noise or any other form of energy, and

(b) application of matter in solid liquid or gaseous form.

(3) No such offence is committed if the force or impact, not being intended or likely to cause injury, is in the circumstances such as is generally acceptable in the ordinary conduct of daily life and the defendant does not know or believe that it is in fact unacceptable to the other person.

(4) A person guilty of an offence under this section shall be liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding £1,500 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months or to both.

 

 

Section 4

 

  1. (1) A person who intentionally or recklessly causes serious harm to another shall be guilty of an offence.

(2) A person guilty of an offence under this section shall be liable on conviction on indictment to a fine or to imprisonment for life or to both.

Definition of serious harm: “serious harm” means injury which creates a substantial risk of death or which causes serious disfigurement or substantial loss or impairment of the mobility of the body as a whole or of the function of any particular bodily member or organ.

Criminal Justice (Public Order) Act

General criminal law (active)
Year enacted
1994
Relevant text of the law

Section 15

Violent disorder.

15.—(1) Where—

(a) three or more persons who are present together at any place (whether that place is a public place or a private place or both) use or threaten to use unlawful violence, and

(b) the conduct of those persons, taken together, is such as would cause a person of reasonable firmness present at that place to fear for his or another person’s safety,

then, each of the persons using or threatening to use unlawful violence shall be guilty of the offence of violent disorder.

(2) For the purposes of this section—

(a) it shall be immaterial whether or not the three or more persons use or threaten to use unlawful violence simultaneously;

(b) no person of reasonable firmness need actually be, or be likely to be, present at that place.

(3) A person shall not be convicted of the offence of violent disorder unless the person intends to use or threaten to use violence or is aware that his conduct may be violent or threaten violence.

(4) A person guilty of an offence of violent disorder shall be liable on conviction on indictment to a fine or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years or to both.

(5) A reference, however expressed, in any enactment passed before the commencement of this Act—

(a) to the common law offence of riot, or

(b) to the common law offence of riot and to tumult,

shall be construed as a reference to the offence of violent disorder.

(6) The common law offence of rout and the common law offence of unlawful assembly are hereby abolished.

Acknowledgements

Our thanks to Australian law firm Hall & Wilcox for their research assistance to confirm current relevant legislation.

This information was last reviewed in April 2020